Why “Ripplestone”?

It seems that light has a very contradictory nature. Physics demonstrates that light can be viewed as particles, but simultaneously as waves. This paradoxical nature of light is called “wave-particle duality”, and also holds true for atoms as well.

A particle is a thing, like a stone. But a wave is really an action — a rippling motion. In a sense, light (and atoms) are simultaneously nouns and verbs. Being both the nouns and verbs of our shared reality, light and the elements provide the fundamental and mysterious core of our reality.

For me, the word “ripplestone” evokes this dual-natured foundation of our physical world.

Ripplestone, 2012

Ripplestone, 2012

And yet, there seems to be much more to the world than just these fundamental “bits”. Our lives are much richer than that. Subjective ideas, emotions, metaphors — these very much define our world as well. Expressive thoughts compliment the basic construction of the physical world — they provide the adjectives, adverbs, meter and rhyme of our lives.

Like the energetic but yielding ripple in a lake and the rigid and tranquil stone at its shore, elemental things interact and change one another, and yet each follows its own pace and rhythm. Surprisingly, “ripplestone” also elicits this poetic feeling within me.

Trees and Light, 2013

Trees and Light, 2013

Merging these two realms together — the foundational with the poetic — our existence becomes much more complete. Life is grounded yet also mysterious and sometimes even lyrical.

Maybe I don’t have two reasons for the name Ripplestone after all. Maybe it’s only one reason seen from two sides.

Early Autumn, 2012

Early Autumn, 2012

Rooted in reality but soaring with expressive thought, photography can be an art that addresses both sides of our wondrous world.


Small embossed Ripplestone logo